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Silver Nanoparticles May One Day Be Key To Devices That Keep Hearts Beating Strong And Steady

Diamonds and gold may make some hearts flutter on Valentine's Day, but in a University at Buffalo laboratory, silver nanoparticles are being designed to do just the opposite. The nanoparticles are part of a new family of materials being created in the laboratory of SUNY Distinguished Professor and Greatbatch Professor of Advanced Power Sources Esther Takeuchi, PhD, who developed the lithium/silver vanadium oxide battery. The battery was a major factor in bringing implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) into production in the late 1980s. ICDs shock the heart into a normal rhythm when it goes into fibrillation. Twenty years later, with more than 300, 000 of these units being implanted every year, the majority of them are powered by the battery system developed and improved by Takeuchi and her team.

OrbusNeich Announces First Patient Enrolled In Randomized Clinical Trial Of Genous TM Bio-engineered R Stent TM In China

OrbusNeich announced that the first patient has been enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of the Genous Bio-engineered R stent in China. A multicenter, randomized, controlled study, the trial will enroll 180 patients split evenly between the control and test arms at 11 sites countrywide. The primary study objective is to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of the Genous Bio-engineered R stent compared to the Medtronic Endeavor Sprint stent. The study population will consist of patients ages 18 to 75 with symptoms of angina or myocardial ischemia. The primary endpoints are difference in Major Adverse Cardiac Event (MACE) rates between the two groups at 12 months following implant and 270 day angiographic Late Loss (LL).

New Study Uses Adult Stem Cells In Effort To Save Limbs Of Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease

Grant Medical Center recently completed the nation's first published study of a new procedure that may give hope to millions of patients facing lower limb amputations from peripheral arterial disease (PAD). PAD is a painful circulatory problem in the legs that affects 10 million Americans. If left untreated, it can lead to serious complications such as stroke, amputation and death. The December issue of The Journal of Vascular Surgery has published the results of a clinical trial at Grant documenting the outcomes of nine patients who received a groundbreaking transplant of adult stem cells. The study was designed to see if the stem cells would cause new blood vessels to grow bypassing severely narrowed or clogged arteries.

10th Annual Spring Meeting On Cardiovascular Nursing

Geneva, situated at the heart of Europe, provides a fitting setting for the 10th Annual Spring Meeting of the European Society of Cardiology Council (ESC) on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professionals (CCNAP), 12 - 13 March 2010, with its special theme: "Uniting to Improve Cardiovascular Practice". "Problems in cardiology are universal, but different countries have developed different ways of managing them. The idea of the Spring meeting is to unite nurses and allied health professionals across the globe, enabling them to share best practice with the ultimate hope of raising standards of practice in cardiology, " said Professor Christi Deaton, Chairperson of the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions.

Doctors Urged To Manage Cardiovascular Risk Factors Of Migraine Sufferers

Migraine sufferers are twice as likely to have heart attacks as people without migraine, according to a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The study, published in the February 10 online issue of Neurology, found that migraine sufferers also face increased risk for stroke and were more likely to have key risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. "Migraine has been viewed as a painful condition that affects quality of life, but not as a threat to people's overall health, " said lead investigator Richard B. Lipton, M.D., senior author of the study and professor and vice chair in The Saul R.

Research Could Lead To Way To Halt Deadly Immune Response

Researchers have teased out the molecular process that can shut down a marauding, often deadly immune response that kills thousands each year who suffer battlefield casualties, heart attacks, strokes, automobile accidents and oxygen deprivation, according to an article published in the January edition of Molecular Immunology. The article provides additional detail about the enormously complex biomechanics of a reaction first observed in the lab by Neel Krishna, Ph.D., and Kenji Cunnion, M.D., while conducting pediatric research at Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters (CHKD) and Eastern Virginia Medical School (EVMS) in Norfolk, Va. "Military medics and ER doctors know that one of the most common killers is an out-of-control immune system that destroys organs after a patient who has suffered a trauma is ostensibly stabilized, " said Krishna, a pediatric virologist at CHKD and assistant professor of microbiology and molecular cell biology at EVMS.

St. Jude Medical Announces European Launch Of USB Cellular Adaptor For Merlin Home Transmitter

St. Jude Medical, Inc. (NYSE:STJ) announced European CE Mark approval of its USB cellular adaptor for the Merlin@home(TM) transmitter, a system that allows important patient data from an implantable cardiac device to be wirelessly downloaded and securely transmitted via telephone for review by a physician. The new USB adaptor allows patients using a Merlin@home transmitter to transfer data to their physician over the cellular network, in addition to the existing landline service previously available. "The USB cellular adaptor allows patients who frequently travel or relocate to be free of the restrictions of a traditional telephone line, " said Dr. Helen H√łgh Petersen, of Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Leading Expert In Hemodynamics Aims To Use New Emulator Technology To Eliminate Blood Clotting In Cardiovascular Devices

On Jan. 22, Danny Bluestein, PhD, Professor of Bioengineering at the State University of New York (SUNY) Stony Brook, in collaboration with Marvin J. Slepian, M.D., Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) at the University of Arizona, submitted a Phase II Quantum Grant proposal to the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). "During Phase I of this project, we developed and tested the Device Thrombogenicity Emulator (DTE), " said Dr. Bluestein. "The DTE measures the potential for blood clotting in cardiovascular devices by mimicking the conditions in the device as extracted from advanced numerical simulations. Conceptually, it is analogous to a wind tunnel used for aeronautic and automotive testing.

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue In Heart Disease Awareness

Racial gaps exist in women's heart-health awareness, women's knowledge of heart attack warning signs requires attention and nearly half of women report they would not call 9-1-1 if they were having heart attack symptoms, according to new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a journal of the American Heart Association. Results of the study, commissioned by the American Heart Association, revealed that although 60 percent of white women were aware of heart disease as the leading cause of death for women, less than half of African-American (43 percent), Hispanic (44 percent) and Asian (34 percent) women identified heart disease as the leading cause.

High Prevalence Of Atrial Fibrillation Found Among Cross-Country Skiers

Next month, in the Norwegian town of Rena, 12, 000 elite cross-country skiers will line up for this year's Birkebeiner ski marathon, an annual endurance race which will take them through 54 kilometres of snow-covered countryside to the winter sports resort of Lillehammer. The race has been run almost every year since 1932, and in 1976 almost 150 participants were invited to take part in a long-term study designed to discover the extent of latent heart disease in these elite cross-country skiers. Now, after some 30 years, the results of the follow-up study have been published and suggest that long-distance competition skiers - as well as other endurance athletes - are at an unusually high risk of atrial fibrillation, the most common abnormality of the heart's beating rhythm.

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