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In Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Treatment, More Pain Means Real Gain

The saying "more pain, more gain" may be true for those already in terrible pain due to a chronic and debilitating condition, contrary to received wisdom. For those with Type I Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), working through the pain of an aggressive physiotherapy program often leads to far better results than a more cautious pain-free approach. That was the result of a new study in Clinical Rehabilitation, published this week by SAGE. In fact, nearly half those who were given the painful treatment recovered normal physical function, whereas those who avoided painful physiotherapy usually had further loss of physical function. CRPS is a chronic progressive disease characterized by severe pain, swelling and changes in the skin.

Too Much Texting Linked To Neck And Shoulder Pain

Preliminary research on college students in the US suggests that too much texting can lead to neck and shoulder pain, similar to that found in older adults who develop injuries from prolonged and repeated use of computers. Judith Gold, an ergonomics researcher at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, presented the preliminary findings of her study at this year's annual meeting of the American Public Health Association, that took place this week in Philadelphia. Gold, who is an assistant professor of Epidemiology at the College of Health Professions and Social Work at Temple University, where she also directs the Ergonomics and Work Physiology Laboratory, told the press that texting is probably doing for this generation of young adults aged 18 to 21 what years in front of a computer did for older adults: it is putting them at risk of serious injury.

Study: Physical Therapists Can Reduce Disability And Improve Function In Patients Who Have Undergone Single-Level Microdiskectomy

Patients who have undergone a single-level lumbar microdiskectomy for lumbar disk herniation experienced significant improvement in physical function following an intensive, progressive physical therapist guided exercise and education program, according to a research report published in the November issue of Physical Therapy (PTJ), the scientific journal of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). Low back pain continues to be the most prevalent musculoskeletal problem, and one cause is lumbar disk herniation accompanied by sciatica-with many cases resulting in lumbar diskectomy. Up to 35 percent of patients continue to have pain and impaired function after surgery, which may be related to the type of postoperative care that they receive.

More Pain Means Real Gain In Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Treatment

Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC (November 12, 2009) The saying "more pain, more gain" may be true for those already in terrible pain due to a chronic and debilitating condition, contrary to received wisdom. For those with Type I Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), working through the pain of an aggressive physiotherapy program often leads to far better results than a more cautious pain-free approach. That was the result of a new study in Clinical Rehabilitation, published this week by SAGE. In fact, nearly half those who were given the painful treatment recovered normal physical function, whereas those who avoided painful physiotherapy usually had further loss of physical function.

What Is Dystonia? What Causes Dystonia?

Dystonia is a general term which describes involuntary movements and extended muscle contractions - a range of movement disorders. The patient has twisting body movements, tremor and unusual or awkward postures. For some patients the whole body may be involved in the movements, while for others only certain parts of the body are affected. Dystonia symptoms may be linked to specific tasks, such as writing, as in writer's cramp. Dystonia may be inherited, but without a genetic pattern - a sporadic inheritance. People may develop dystonia symptoms as a result of taking certain medications. Some diseases, such as some forms of lung cancer may also produce signs and symptoms of dystonia.

Symptoms Of Depression Improved By Motivational Women-Only Cardiac Rehab

Depressive symptoms improved among women with coronary heart disease who participated in a motivationally-enhanced cardiac rehabilitation program exclusively for women, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2009. Depression often co-occurs with heart disease and is found more often in women with heart disease than in men. Depression also interferes with adherence to lifestyle modifications and the willingness to attend rehabilitation. "Women often don't have the motivation to attend cardiac rehab particularly if they're depressed, " said Theresa Beckie, Ph.D., lead investigator and author of the study and professor at the University of South Florida's College of Nursing in Tampa, Florida.

Oscar Pistorius' Artificial Limbs Give Him Clear, Major Advantage For Sprint Running

The artificial lower limbs of double-amputee Olympic hopeful Oscar Pistorius give him a clear and major advantage over his competition, taking 10 seconds or more off what his 400-meter race time would be if his prosthesis behaved like intact limbs. That's the conclusion - released to the public for the first time - of human performance experts Peter Weyand of Southern Methodist University in Dallas and Matthew Bundle of the University of Wyoming. The Weyand-Bundle conclusion is part of a written Point-Counterpoint style debate published online in the Journal of Applied Physiology on Nov. 19. Weyand and Bundle were the first two authors of the study publishing the test results acquired as part of the legal appeal process undertaken after the governing body of Track and Field - the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) - banned Pistorius from able-bodied track competitions, including the Olympics.

MU Occupational Therapy Professor Says Recovery From Brain Injuries Can Last A Lifetime

Until recently, scientists believed that, following a stroke, a patient had about six months to regain any lost function. After that, patients would be forced to compensate for the lost function by focusing on their remaining abilities. Although this belief has been refuted, a University of Missouri occupational therapy professor believes that the current health system is still not giving patients enough time to recover and underestimating what the human brain can do given the right conditions. In a recent article for OT Practice Magazine, Guy McCormack, clinical professor and chair of the occupational therapy and occupational science department at the MU School of Health Professions, argues that health practitioners believe their clients need more time and motivation to reclaim lost functions, such as the use of an arm, hand or leg.

Residential Design For Persons With Neurological Disability

IOS Press announces the November 2009 publication of a special issue of NeuroRehabilitation: An International Journal devoted to residential design for persons with neurodisability. While there is clearly agreement that the nature of the long-term living environment can improve quality of life and minimize safety risks for individuals who are cognitively, behaviorally and/or physically challenged due to neurodisability, residential design factors are often either ignored or minimally considered. This unique issue calls attention to the important topic of community-based residential designs for persons with neurodisabilities by presenting a compendium of cutting edge design perspectives, insights and practical information not available elsewhere.

What Is Cartilage Damage? What Is Articular Cartilage Damage?

Cartilage structures and functions can relatively easily be harmed, often resulting in damage. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that is found in many areas of the body. This fine, rubbery tissue mainly functions as a cushion for bones at joints. The English word "cartilage" comes from the Latin word cartilage, which means "cartilage" or "gristle". Cartilage has several functions: Shock absorber : Cartilage covers the surface of joints, allowing bones to slide over one another. It reduces any friction, prevents any damage and helps to support weight when moving, bending, stretching or running. Acts as a mould : the tough, flexible cartilage tissue forms specially shaped and curved body parts that would otherwise have no support from the bones.

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